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Viewing posts categorised under: Knowledge

Sinterit Lisa Pro nominated for the 3D Printing Industry Awards 2019

Knowledge | 0 comments

27.03.19

We’re very, very glad to tell you that the readers of 3D Printing Industry nominated our latest printer,  Sinterit Lisa Pro for the 3DPI awards 2019 in the category “Desktop non-FFF 3D printer of the year”.  

Extreme prints positioning by our client Stefan

Knowledge | 0 comments

12.03.19

Although positioning the models in the Sinterit Studio is rather not a very complicated process, some of our clients make it an art. Recently, we’ve got some feedback from our German customer Stefan Radau and we were so impressed that we just had to share these images.  

More precise prints and WiFi camera in the newest Sinterit Studio and printers software update

Knowledge | 0 comments

11.03.19

We have released the new software update which changes a lot for Lisa and Lisa Pro desktop SLS 3D printers users.  

How to prepare a perfect design for SLS technology? WEBINAR

Knowledge, Webinars | 0 comments

20.12.18

We're sharing the recording of our live webinar: How to prepare a perfect design for SLS technology. Konrad Kobus, a mechanical engineer, working in the Research and Development Department at Sinterit, will give you several hints about designing and preparing your models for SLS desktop 3D printer. This knowledge will help you get the most out of this advanced technology.  

Paweł Piszko granted the prestigious “25 under 25” award by Forbes

Knowledge, Pressroom | 0 comments

17.12.18

Without people, there would be no company. We are proud that our chemist, Paweł Piszko, has been granted the prestigious "25 under 25" award by Forbes and the Warsaw office of McKinsey & Company.  

How a Startup from Krakow Got Mentioned
in “The Art of Computer Programming”

Bez kategorii, Knowledge | 0 comments

05.02.18

Every software engineer has heard of Donald Knuth and his book series “The Art of Computer Programming”, called the Computer Programmer's Bible. But not everyone knows about professor Knuth’s fascination with Hamiltonian graphs. This story begins with his visit to the British Museum in London, where he examined ancient Greek icosahedrons whose labels form a Hamiltonian cycle: Α, Β, Γ, Δ, ... , Τ, Υ, Α. Inspired by the exhibits, he added an assignment to his upcoming book. In exercise 7.2.2.4.9, he asked to design a 21st-century version of such an icosahedron, where the bottom edge of each Latin letter A, B, C, D, … , S, T, A coincides with an upper edge of the previous letter. The solution to the exercise ended with the sentence “It would be nice to own a 3D-printed object like this!”  

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